79A Rapid Acting 4" x 10" Jaw - Heavy Duty Woodworking Vises - Woodworking - Bench Vise Woodworking Vise, Duty Rating - Vises Standard Duty, Jaw Width - Vises 10 in, Max. Opening - Vises 13 in, Throat Depth - Vises 4 in, Deep Throat No, Base Type - Vises Stationary, Pipe Jaw Included No, Reversible No, High Visibility No, Jaw Face - Vises Serrated, Quick-Acting Yes, Material -Vises Ductile Iron, Jaw Type Replaceable. Reviews of Wilton #79A. Review Snapshot. by PowerReviews. Find affordable woodworking vises for your workshop at Kmart.� Wilton 79A Wilton Standard Duty Woodworking Vise, 10 in Jaw Width, 13 in Max. Opening, 4 in Throat Depth HAWA 79A. 0. Sold by SIM Supply. The Wilton 79A Bench Vise is a twist-release vise with a in. jaw width. It has an opening capacity of 13 in. and a racking measurement of in. This product received a very good rating for vertical alignment and a good rating for ease of use. The quick-release nut on this vise did not re-engage immediately. The Wilton 79A Bench Vise is available from www.- (Product Number: WMH). Sign up for eletters today and get the latest techniques and how-to from Fine Woodworking, plus special offers. Sign Up. Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox.

Home Articles Installing a Bench Vise. This article is from Issue 41 of Woodcraft Magazine. Vises provide the muscle for securing workpieces for planing, sawing, routing, and other tooling operations. Similar vises may differ in features, but attachment is similar. The first is a simple approach, perfectly appropriate for an end vise application. The second involves recessing the rear jaw flush with the edge of the bench. This is the best approach for a face vise, because the entire length of a board secured for edge work will contact the bench edge for support and additional clamping, as shown in the photo above.

Regardless of the type of mounting, have your vise s in hand before you start so you can determine the size of the spacers, jaws, and hardware needed for a trouble-free installation. Face vises are attached on the front, or face, of the bench; end vises are installed on the end. Southpaws will want to do the opposite. Shift the top if necessary to accommodate the vise.

Because a face vise is used for general work as well as for planing edges, I recommend investing in a larger vise at least 10". The easiest installation entails making spacer blocks to set the tops of the metal jaws below the bench surface while screwing the vise to the underside of a bench. To begin, drive the roll pin from the end of the vise screw, remove the connecting bracket and the front jaw, and then degrease the vise of its protective coating.

To determine the thickness of your spacer blocks, place the rear jaw upside down on the inverted benchtop and measure how much the top of the jaw projects beyond the underside. The former is necessary for better dog height on the smaller vise. Countersink the holes in the rear jaw Photo A , and then attach the rear cheek with flathead wood screws and the front cheek with roundhead screws and washers.

Make your spacer block s. Use two for an end vise to provide dog clearance. Plane them to your determined thickness, and size them in length and width to suit the mounting hole surfaces on the rear jaw bracket, as shown in Photo B. Sandwich the blocks between the bracket and the bench, trace the locations of the mounting holes, and drill clearance holes through the spacers.

Reattach the connecting bracket, washer, and roll pin. After turning the benchtop upright, hand-plane the tops of the wooden cheeks flush to the benchtop. Because most vises include an integral dog, it makes sense to incorporate a row of dog holes into your benchtop.

Glue the block to a hooked standoff that registers against the edge of your bench as shown in the photo. Make sure to align the hole with the dog on your vise. Draw a centerline down the rear face of the block for positioning reference. Use a square to lay out the dog hole locations on the bench, spacing them 6" apart starting from the end of the bench. Guide a circular saw along a secured straightedge to rip the length of the notch up to the crosscut.

A flush-mounted face vise offers the most versatility, but it requires more work to install. As with the previous method, handling is easier with the vise disassembled. First, lay out the Homemade Woodworking Vise notch in the benchtop.

Its length should be the width of the jaw plus 1". Make the crosscut into the benchtop edge with a backsaw. Then clamp a straightedge to the bench to guide a circular saw to cut the length of the notch. Rip the notch until you intersect the previous crosscut Photo C , and then finish up with a handsaw.

Attach the rear cheek with 10 flathead woodscrews after countersinking the holes in the jaw. Center the block along the width of the notch, with the edges of each aligned flush at the front. Clamp the block in place, and then attach it to the benchtop with lag screws and washers, as shown in Photo D.

To make the wooden cheek for the rear jaw, first measure the thickness of the jaw. Crosscut the piece and bandsaw the interior to make the U-shaped cheek filler. Then crosscut it to fit the benchtop notch. Countersink the holes on the rear jaw and attach the cheek as shown in Photo F. Position the vise on the spacer block with the cheek nestled in its notch. Mark and drill pilot holes, and attach the vise with washers and lag bolts Photo G. Use a straightedge to ensure the face of the jaw is flush with the edge of the bench.

Make the front cheek, and attach it with Woodworking Vise Lee Valley washers and roundhead woodscrews, reassemble the vise, and turn the benchtop over. Hand-plane the cheeks flush with the benchtop Photo H. My bench had radiused edges, so I chiseled away the sharp point at the corner of the cheek.

Finally, apply a couple of coats of wipe-on finish to all raw wood surfaces. Craig Bentzley has been restoring antiques and building furniture for nearly 40 years. In addition to writing, Craig also teaches at guilds, woodworking shows, and at Woodcraft stores. Quick View. Add to Cart. Eclipse - 9" Quick Release Vise. WoodRiver - 7" Quick Release Vise. WoodRiver - 9" Quick Release Vise. WoodRiver - You must be logged in to write a comment.

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Resin Casting. Shop Talk. Woodcraft Magazine. Woodworking Adventures. Download PDF. Give your workbench the holding power it deserves. Countersink the through-holes on the back of the rear jaw to allow attaching the cheek with flathead screws.

Install the vise with washers and lag screws that project through clearance holes in the two spacer blocks. Simple mounting The easiest installation entails making spacer blocks to set the tops of the metal jaws below the bench surface while screwing the vise to the underside of a bench. Drilling Dog Holes Because most vises include an integral dog, it makes sense to incorporate a row of dog holes into your benchtop.

Flush-Mount A flush-mounted face vise offers the most versatility, but it requires more work to install. Attach the spacer block with lag screws through counter-bored holes.

Snug the rear jaw assembly firmly in place while tightening the lag screws. Plane the cheeks level to the benchtop, and relieve any sharp corners with a chisel inset. About Our Author Craig Bentzley has been restoring antiques and building furniture for nearly 40 years. Related Products Quick View Item Quick View Item Write Comment You must be logged in to write a comment. Learn More. Customer Care Talk to a friendly customer care representative to help with your purchase.

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